Do You Have Color Blindness or A Color Vision Deficiency?

Imagine the challenges a driver who cannot see any colors would face when trying to obey traffic signs. A police officer who cannot describe what a suspect was wearing when he was last seen would have significant difficulties. Color blindness and color vision deficiencies can affect everything he does, from something as simple as choosing what to wear to critical skills his job might require, such as differentiating colored wires in an electrical circuit. Getting a proper diagnosis can help you understand what type of color vision problem he has, making it much easier to seek treatment.

How do you see in color?

The eye has a color spectrum of approximately seven million colors. Our eyes contain three types of cells or “cones” that contain photographic pigments that allow us to see color. Within a small hole near the optic nerve there are approximately six to seven million photoreceptors or cones of three types: S cones, M cones, and L cones, and the letters represent short, medium, and long wavelength light. The wavelengths of the reflected lights control the colors that the eyes see. The three light cones generate the colors red, green, blue, and their various hues. A person with normal color vision has and uses three light cones. Any damage or absence of the cones results in color blindness or a deficiency in color vision.

Color blindness occurs when the pigments in your photos are so abnormal that you cannot detect any color, so everything appears gray. Total color blindness is very rare.
A deficiency in color vision occurs when the color blind glasses philippines
pigments in your photos are abnormal and cause your perception of color to be limited. For example, it may not be able to detect red or green or both red and green, or it may not be able to detect blue or yellow or blue and yellow, etc.
Types of color vision deficiencies

Monochromaticity is a very rare condition, which is “true color blindness”, in which a person only sees one color or does not see any color. It occurs when a person has only one or no photographic pigment in their cones.

Dichromacia is an eye condition that causes a person to see only two of the three colors. It occurs when a person only two of the photographic pigments in his cones or two of the three cones are damaged in some way.

Tritan Vision is a very rare form of color vision deficit, often referred to as “blue-yellow color blindness” because it affects the photographic pigments of the blue cone in the eye. Tritan’s vision can be congenital or it can develop as a result of illness or injury. There are two types of Tritan color vision deficiency:

Tritanopia is a form of color blindness that causes a person to see blue as green and yellow as shades or purple or gray. Reds appear pink. It occurs when short wavelength cones or “S cones” are missing in the eye.
Tritanomaly is a form of color blindness that causes a person to see blues as greener and yellower and reds as shades of pink. It occurs when the functionality of the “S cones” is limited.
Protan Vision is the most common color vision deficit, often referred to as “red-green color blindness,” because it affects the photographic pigments of the red cone in the eye. Protan’s vision is an inherited visual defect.

There are two types of deficiencies in Protan’s color vision:

Protanopia is a form of color blindness, known as “red blind,” where the person cannot distinguish colors with shades of red such as red, orange, pink, violet or purple. Red appears as black. Orange and green appear as yellow. It occurs when long wavelength cones or “L-cones” are missing.
Protanomaly is a form of color blindness, known as “faint red,” which causes a person to see any shade of red, yellow, or orange with a greenish cast. It occurs when the functionality of the “cones in L” is faulty.